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Angel’s Inn adult home’s administrator is owner’s son

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D. Brady Drummond-Ryan is back home.

The 56-year-old recently moved to the apartment where he lived as a boy above Angel’s Inn adult home. Mr. Drummond-Ryan returned to Watertown in April so he could run the business for his mother, Mary E. Allen, after having been out of the area for more than three decades.

“I felt it’d be a shame to see this go,” he said Wednesday, as he led a tour of the 7,500-square-foot facility. “A lot of people thought we closed because Whispering Pines closed.”

The confusion came, he said, because Angel’s Inn is on Pine Street. Whispering Pines, the Jefferson County adult home on Coffeen Street, has closed, but Angel’s Inn remains open with 10 residents. Mr. Drummond-Ryan said there are 17 rooms that can hold a total of 24 people.

Although his wife, Myra, and adult daughter remain in Charlotte, N.C., Mr. Drummond-Ryan moved to the area this spring when Mrs. Allen asked him to manage the business. He said her whole life has been dedicated to caring for the elderly, with the past 67 years at Angel’s Inn.

She still lives in the county, he said, but scaled back her involvement with the home after she became ill with pneumonia in the spring. Mr. Drummond-Ryan said that at 89 years old, his mother finally is ready to retire.

Mrs. Allen declined to comment Wednesday.

Mr. Brady, a 1975 graduate of South Jefferson Central School, Adams, is the facility’s administrator. He said he is purchasing Angel’s Inn from his mother and is awaiting approval from the state Department of Health to transfer the business’s certificate of need to his name.

While he grew up at the 518 Pine St. property and helped his father, Robert Ryan, build additions over the years, he did not work there steadily. Some of his nine siblings, he said, had designated roles there.

Mr. Drummond-Ryan recalled spending much of his childhood at Angel’s Inn, even getting caught by his mother while he was wheelchair-racing in the basement.

He left the area shortly after high school and received a bachelor’s degree in English from Binghamton University in 1979 and a master’s degree in social work from Florida State University in 1982.

He has had jobs involving nonprofit agencies, fundraising and real estate and was an underwriter for Wells Fargo. Now he is in charge of 14 employees, including a bookkeeper, certified nursing assistants, cooks, housekeepers and home health aides.

“Everything I’ve done has prepared me for this moment,” Mr. Drummond-Ryan said.

Once the paperwork is squared away, he said, he will apply for some enhanced-living beds in order to offer another level of care. Residents of the home must be able to care for themselves and be mobile, but may need help with daily activities. People can go to Angel’s Inn for respite or long-term care as long as they meet certain criteria.

Mr. Drummond-Ryan said the residents range in age from 65 to 100.

He said he will use his skills in sales and marketing to attract more residents. He recently completed a brochure, the first of its kind for Angel’s Inn. The facility is private-pay, with fees of $850 a week for a double-occupancy room and $950 a week for a single-occupancy room.

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